irish loop off road (ILOR)

ilor

400 km, 5 days and 4 nights. Green triangles indicate where I camped.

Over the May 24th long weekend I tackled the route I’ve been calling “Irish Loop Off Road” or ILOR.  If anybody has a better name let me know (Paul C?).  Amy, Paul and I first tackled this route two years ago, that time riding it in a counter-clockwise direction and learning what worked and what didn’t.  This iteration of the route is much better.

This ride has it all:  80% of it is on dirt, the majority of the paved sections are on quiet roads; single track, dirt roads, ATV tracks, 2 hike-a-bike sections; great vistas; wildlife (I saw caribou, moose and a snowy owl on this trip); resupply is easy; free camping; water is easily available.

I now have GPX files for this route – if you would like them just drop me an email:  theslowbiker at gmail.com.

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gros morne fatbike 2016

Easter fell during a prime time for fatbiking Gros Morne this year, so Darren and I made plans to go there for the week.  We had a short, preliminary exploration of the park last year and knew that there was lots more we wanted to ride.  We weren’t disappointed…

Our Good Friday feast. At the junction of the Trans-Canada highway and Route 420 is White Bay Convenience. The food is fantastic - we had supper, breakfast and lunch there.

Our Good Friday feast. At the junction of the Trans-Canada highway and Route 420 is White Bay Convenience. The food is fantastic – we had supper, breakfast and lunch there.

 

Western Brook Pond

Day 1

 

Here's the route we took. (Darren McD image)

Here’s the route we took. Taylor’s Brook Road begins on Route 420. Drive in 3 kilometers and you will find Taylor’s Brook Accommodations. Ask for Terry – he will set you up with a place to park for a small fee (we paid $15 for 3 days, two nights). He will also have LOADS of knowledge about trail conditions. Pick his brain. (Darren McD image)

Here's the route with elevation. (Darren McD image)

Here’s the route with elevation.
(Darren McD image)

Darren and I at the start.

Darren and I at the start.

Looking west, on Taylors Brook Road.

Looking west, on Taylors Brook Road. The first 24 km are groomed. At Km 24 our route took a left off the groomed stuff and our real work began.

PR take 2

 

This is the view looking west. That is Matty's Pond in the left of the picture. The arrow shows the cove we camped in.

This is the view looking west. That is Matty’s Pond in the left of the picture, where we made camp.

On Matty's Pond.

On Matty’s Pond.

Stats from our first day.

Stats from our first day. We began at 10 AM and stopped at 5 PM. Elevation gained, fully packed bikes and loose trail for the final 16 km kept average speed low.

Running water was scarce; luckily I found these ice fishing holes near our camp. Unfortunately, they were frozen over the next morning.

Running water was scarce; luckily I found these ice fishing holes near our camp. Unfortunately, they were frozen over the next morning.

Day 2

It went down to -18C our first night and -15C our second.

It went down to -18C our first night and -15C our second.

Our camp on Matty's Pond.

Our camp on Matty’s Pond.

The start of Day 2. Blue sky and no wind.

The start of Day 2. Blue sky and no wind.

The riding was fantastic.

The riding was fantastic.

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image

Mountain take 2

 

Click on the image above to enlarge it, then look for Darren on the ridge line to get perspective on the vastness we were riding in.

Click on the image above to enlarge it, then look for Darren on the ridge line to get perspective on the vastness we were riding in.

We did it!

We did it!

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Everyone wants their photo taken at The Gorge.

Everyone wants their photo taken at The Gorge.

Parks Canada staff were checking for park passes. Yes, we had ours.

Parks Canada staff were checking for park passes. Yes, we had ours.

Leaving The Gorge.

Leaving The Gorge.

We stopped to watch the sledders high-pointing.

We stopped to watch the sledders high-pointing.

A friendly snowmobiler offered me a beer.

A friendly snowmobiler offered me a beer.

Stats for the trip from our camp to Western Brook Pond look off and back. Check out that max speed!

Stats for the trip from our camp to Western Brook Pond look off and back. Check out that max speed!

Day 3

The descent down onto Matty's Pond was a scream; the climb back up, not so much...

The descent down onto Matty’s Pond was a scream; the climb back up, not so much…

Snowmobilers were always courteous and encouraging. (Jeff Spurrell photo)

Snowmobilers were always courteous and encouraging. We were loosing elevation on the way out and the trails were firmer, so it only took 4 hours to reach the car versus 7 hours to get in. (Jeff Spurrell photo)

Wigwam Pond

The weather was lousy all day Tuesday but we did manage to get in a night ride on the Wigwam Pond trail.

The weather was lousy all day Tuesday but we did manage to get in a night ride on the Wigwam Pond trail.

Ten Mile Pond

Ten Mile Pond sits at the base of Gros Morne; anyone who has climbed to the summit has looked down onto this pond.  We went looking for the chance to be on the pond looking up at the summit.

Logistically, this is an easy ride.  Park at the Gros Morne Visitors Centre in Rocky Harbour.  Ride up to Route 430 and across the road you will see a road that leads to Eastern Arm Pond.  Follow the snowmobile tracks.

 

Heading in to Eastern Arm Pond. That is Gros Morne to the right.

Heading in to Eastern Arm Pond. That is Gros Morne to the right.

On Eastern Arm Pond.

On Eastern Arm Pond.

After crossing Eastern Arm Pond the trail twists and turns through a small forest.

After crossing Eastern Arm Pond the trail twists and turns through a small forest.

A river, a forest, mountains and a twisty-turny snowmobile track to follow; fatbiking doesn't get any better than this.

A river, a forest, mountains and a twisty-turny snowmobile track to follow; fatbiking doesn’t get any better than this.

Careful where you step, though...

Careful where you step, though…

(a Darren McD photo)

(a Darren McD photo)

The entrance to Ten Mile Pond. (a Darren McD photo)

The entrance to Ten Mile Pond.
(a Darren McD photo)

Ten Mile Pond with Gros Morne in the background. (a Darren McD photo)

Ten Mile Pond with Gros Morne in the background.
(a Darren McD photo)

(a Darren McD photo)

Click to enlarge for the full perspective. (a Darren McD photo)

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At the end of Ten Mile Pond.

At the end of Ten Mile Pond.

Returning from Ten Mile Pond with The Tablelands in the distance.

Returning from Ten Mile Pond with The Tablelands in the distance.

Stats for our ride into Ten Mile Pond and back.

Stats for our ride into Ten Mile Pond and back.

Tablelands / Trout River

This was our view of The Tablelands. Visibility was poor so we didn't venture up there.

This was our view of The Tablelands. Visibility was poor so we didn’t venture up there.

The postmaster came out to ask if we were the fellows who biked to The Gorge. She had heard the piece on the radio and seen our picture on Facebook.

The postmaster came out to ask if we were the fellows who biked to The Gorge. She had heard the piece on the radio and seen our picture on Facebook.

Link to the radio interview on CBC Corner Brook: click here.

The beach at Trout River.

The beach at Trout River.

The bumper sticker says it best.

The bumper sticker says it best.

Thank you:

  • Tim C for use of your GPS and your local knowledge
  • Darroch W for letting us stay at your house while we were in Rocky Harbour

it’s the 24th of May and we likes to get away…

…up in the woods or going out the bay.

I chose to go out the bay, Conception Bay North (CBN), to be exact – as tempting as the gravels pits were. 🙂  I’d done this route two years ago and wanted to ride it again and the long weekend in May seemed as good a time as any.  The weather cooperated (for the most part) and Dan T joined me for two days – his first bikepacking trip.

CBN 2015 001

Here are some instructions I wrote for a Dutch couple that rode the route last year. The T’Railway from St. John’s to Brigus Junction is pretty straightforward but once started on the old CBN branch line the track disappears from time to time.

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Looking across to Bell Island.

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This large erratic on the beach always intrgues me.

The train station in Avondale.

The train station in Avondale.

First night camping spot, halfway between Avondale and Brigus Junction.

First night camping spot, halfway between Avondale and Brigus Junction.

It's was nice to see this guy out the next morning.

It’s was nice to see this guy out the next morning.

Into The Wild, Newfoundland style.

Into The Wild, Newfoundland style.

Dan considers trading in the fatbike for something a little racier.

Dan considers trading in the fatbike for something a little racier.

Bay Roberts.

Bay Roberts.

Sometimes the trail becomes a river.

Sometimes the trail becomes a river.

CBN 2015 157

Spaniards Bay.

The Kyle, in Harbour Grace, with an iceberg in the background.

The Kyle, in Harbour Grace, with an iceberg in the background.

The point of land in the right of the picture is where we camped.

The point of land in the right of the picture is where we camped.

The view from the tent.

The view from the tent.

CBN 2015 135

Dan negotiating a washout.

Dan negotiating a washout.

CBN 2015 113CBN 2015 130

I came across some unusual road kill on the way home...

I came across some unusual road kill on the way home…

...so I put her up in a tree, because that's where monkeys belong.

…so I put her up in a tree, because that’s where monkeys belong.

fatbike gros morne

From R-L: Darren, Ross and the writer go on an exploratory mission to Gros Morne National Park to see what the potential is for fatbiking.  We are happy to report the news is all good.  (a Darroch W photo)

From R-L: Darren, Ross and the writer go on an exploratory mission to Gros Morne National Park to see what the potential is for fatbiking. We are happy to report the news is all good. (a Darroch W photo)

We stayed at Old Lincoln Cabins, seen here.  We arrived to 30 cm of fresh powder on top of the 400+ cm that had fallen in previous months.

We stayed at Old Lincoln Cabins, seen here. We arrived to 30 cm of fresh powder on top of the 400+ cm that had fallen in previous months.

On Day 1 we left from Rocky Harbour and headed up the town's water supply road, following a fresh snowmobile track.  We were soon rewarded with great views of Gros Morne.  We had to turn back at this pond as we lost the track due to drifting.

On Day 1 we left from Rocky Harbour and headed up the town’s water supply road, following a fresh snowmobile track. We were soon rewarded with great views of Gros Morne. We had to turn back at this pond as we lost the track due to drifting.

Pro tip: Replacing lost fluids after a ride is critical.

Pro tip: Replacing lost fluids after a ride is critical.

Ross demonstrates proper fluid replacement for those of you new to this sport.

Ross demonstrates proper fluid replacement for those of you new to this sport.

Daytime highs were in the minus teens while we were there.  We woke up to -26C one morning.

Daytime highs were in the minus teens while we were there. We woke up to -26C one morning.

Fatbikers are a cultured lot; we attended this artsy evening of poetry and music at the old cottage hospital in Norris Point.

Fatbikers are a cultured lot; we attended this artsy evening of poetry and music at the old cottage hospital in Norris Point.

This is Tom Dawe reading some of his poetry - I liked him a lot.  The highlight of the evening, without a doubt, were Sherman Downey & Matthew Byrne.

This is Tom Dawe reading some of his poetry – I liked him a lot. The highlight of the evening, without a doubt, were Sherman Downey & Matthew Byrne. Yes, that is an old hospital ward room we are in.

Day 2 we left right from our cabin and headed to a feature called The Sinkhole.  We followed high traffic snowmobile trails.

Day 2 we left right from our cabin and headed to a feature called The Sinkhole. We followed high traffic snowmobile trails.

The sections through the trees were lovely.

The sections through the trees were lovely.

Some of the open areas were a bit more difficult, even for our motorized friends.

Some of the open areas were a bit more difficult, even for our motorized friends.

Ross looking boss.

Ross looking boss.

Lots and lots and lots of snow.

Lots and lots and lots of snow.

Fatbike heaven.

Fatbike heaven.

We made it to the warm-up hut at the turnoff to The Sinkhole but couldn't get any further due to drifting.  We were quite a hit with the snowmobile crowd.

We made it to the warm-up hut at the turnoff to The Sinkhole but couldn’t get any further due to drifting. We were quite a hit with the snowmobile crowd.

Day 3, our last day, was the best by far.  Here we are driving in to Rocky Harbour to meet up with Darrock W who works for Parks Canada and is an old roadie aquaintence of mine from "back in the day".  We brought a fatbike for him and in return he guided us on an excellent ride, cooked us moose burgers and had a great selection of beer waiting at his house.

Day 3, our last day, was the best by far. Here we are driving in to Rocky Harbour to meet up with Darrock W who works for Parks Canada and is an old roadie aquaintence of mine from “back in the day”. We brought a fatbike for him and in return he guided us on an excellent ride, cooked us moose burgers and had a great selection of beer waiting at his house.

Gros Morne to my right, primo trail to my left.  Happy.

Gros Morne to my right, primo trail to my left. Happy.

We had some blue sky and light winds to start the day.

We had some blue sky and light winds to start the day.

Darroch.

Darroch.

PnS 046

The descent into Bakers Brook Pond was an absolute scream!

The descent into Bakers Brook Pond was an absolute scream! (a Darroch W photo)

Some friends of Darroch's had the cabin at Bakers Brook booked, so we stopped there for lunch.

Some friends of Darroch’s had the cabin at Bakers Brook booked, so we stopped there for lunch.

On our way out.

On our way out.

PnS 050

This was our route, 30 km total, starting and ending at the Visitors Centre in Rocky Harbour.

This was our route, 30 km total, starting and ending at the Visitors Centre in Rocky Harbour. That is Gros Morne in the upper right and Bakers Brook Pond in upper left. (a Darroch W image)

Random bits

  • we stayed at Old Lincoln Cabins.  4 nights cost us $225 each, taxes in.
  • we would stay there again – the owners, Luann and Carter, went out of their way to be helpful.  There is a barn with a woodstove to store bikes in and an outdoor hot tub. Coyle’s general store is one minute away. The only minor complaints were no cell service there and a weak Wi-Fi signal.
  • we ate a great meal at The Jackladder, just 10 minutes from where we stayed.
  • having some local knowledge from Darroch was invaluable.  Thanks again from all of us.
  • we barely scratched the surface of what is possible  in Gros Morne.  Given that it is the only national park in Canada that allows snowmobiles it stands to reason that it will have the greatest potential for fatbiking of any national park.

’14 – ’15 winter season (so far)

As I write this it is March 1st and I’m reflecting back on the winter riding season to date.  Certainly a few things stand out: the snow came late, the ice has been plentiful, the number of fatbikers is soaring, we’ve had a couple of social events, trail grooming is about to start happening, and lots of people have upgraded their fatbikes after only buying their first one a year ago (and some people have upgraded even quicker than that).

SBR Feb'15

We have seen a lot of icy trails this year. Multiple thaw/freeze cycles and periods of heavy rain have made the trails “challenging”.

Studded tires have be a must-have this winter.

Studded tires: a must-have this winter.

A first for me this winter was seeing a pack of coyotes (3) as I rounded a corner on the back roads in The Goulds.  I have seen individual coyotes but never a pack.  I managed to capture of picture of this one - the other two scattered quickly.  Click on the image and enlarge it for a better view.

A first for me this winter was seeing a pack of coyotes (3) as I rounded a corner on the back roads in The Goulds. I have seen individual coyotes but never a pack. I managed to capture a picture of one – the other two scattered quickly. Click on the image and enlarge it for a better view.

Coyote tracks. Coyotes places their back foot in the print made by the front foot, creating a single, straight line of prints.

IMG_0300

Pugsley tracks. Sometimes the rear wheel follows the front wheel and makes a single set of tracks; sometimes not.

We've had a lot of group rides with great turnouts.

We’ve had a lot of group rides with great turnouts.

Dean The Machine leading the way.

Dean The Machine leading the way.

Jason and his new Norco Sasquatch.  Lots of Bluto suspension forks are appearing on bikes, another trend new this season.

Jason and his new Norco Sasquatch. Lots of Bluto suspension forks are appearing on bikes, another trend new this season.

Mel in stealth mode.

Mel in stealth mode.

Yours truly about to take the plunge on a ride to Witless Bay Line.

Yours truly about to take the plunge on a ride to Witless Bay Line.

Sean all smiles on his new Surly Pugsley.

Sean all smiles on his new Surly Pugsley.

There have been a number of riders who have put together beautiful builds around the new 9:ZERO:7 Whiteout frame this year, including:

Mark...

Mark…

...Dwayne...

…Dwayne…

...Jason, and...

…Jason…

...and Darren.

…and Darren.

Tim, Ross, Darren and Dan on the way to The Spout.

Tim, Ross, Darren and Dan on the way to The Spout.

See Ross go!

See Ross go!

See Ross stop!

See Ross stop!

Dean demonstrates, for our amusement, what German engineered road sedans *can't* do.

Dean demonstrates, for our amusement, what German engineered road sedans *can’t* do.

More insight into Dean's world.

More insight into Dean’s world.

Blue skies, firm trails and fat tires make Dan smile.

Blue skies, firm trails and fat tires make Dan smile.

Spout - not! 009

Dan looking pro.

global fatbike day 2014

Facebook_Global_Fat-Bike-600x222Global Fatbike Day was a rip-roaring success here in Newfoundland; not only did we have more participants than last year but we had events in two locations in the province.  The sunshine, blue skies and moderate temperature also helped to make a memorable day.

Here in St. John’s we had more than 20 people show up for a ride in Pippy Park with an after-ride social at Bitters Pub.

GFBD 2014 046

The crowd gathering for the ride in Pippy Park.

 

GFBD 2014 048

GFBD 2014 051

There were lots of fatbikes to drool over. Here’s a new 2015 Beargrease 2…

GFBD 2014 052

Cychotic Bike Shop provided some Norco Sasquatches for people to demo…

GFBD 2014 054

BLING! BLING! Fun ‘n’ Fast showed up with some demos as well including this full suspension Bucksaw.

GFBD 2014 058

Greg riding one of the Norco demos past The Wisdom Tree.

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The trail conditions were ideal – firm, dry and fast. Here the pack waits to regroup.

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A group shot up on Three Pond Barrens.

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Chris strikes a pose on Ridgeline.

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Mel and his Bluto equipped Mukluk. I took it out for a spin and the suspension fork is impressive.

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Fatbikes just make people smile. Robin on Ridgeline.

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Darren sporting his finest t-shirt at the social. And yes, the shirt matches the frame.

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Ross, Julie, Robin and Ray at the social.

Many thanks to:

Cychotic for providing demo bikes;

Fun ‘n’ Fast for demo bikes and food at the social;

Bicycle Newfoundland and Labrador for food at the social;

Canary Cycles for promoting the event on their website; and,

Bitters Pub for allowing us to put some bikes on display.

I personally want to thank Ray Gosine for doing all the heavy lifting to make this year’s event so successful.

 

Central Newfoundland

Gander held its first ever Global Fatbike Day celebration.  Paul and Derick rode 50 km in 3 hours.

IMG_20141206_105943858IMG_20141206_110938055IMG_20141206_115514221_HDRIMG_20141206_121411795_HDRThanks to Paul for providing the pictures.

newfoundland by bicycle – a guest post

Daniel and Jen are a couple from Vermont who toured much of the island of Newfoundland in July and August. We had lots of email correspondence, but despite our hopes to meet up on the trail/road this was the closest we came:

BonaBurin2014

Daniel floated the idea of writing a guest piece for the blog and I jumped on it right away. What better way to document more about the cycling opportunities here than through the eyes of someone visiting Newfoundland for their first time? So, I give you: Daniel and Jen’s Most Excellent Adventure!

Introduction

In July of 2014 we set out on what became a 5 week bike tour of Newfoundland, beginning on the west coast and making a clockwise loop around the island. While known for its icebergs, codfish and abundance of moose, Newfoundland is also home to a seemingly endless network of gravel, dirt and secondary paved roads. We opted for routes that would get us into the more remote parts of Newfoundland, places better suited to bike than car. Our efforts were repaid with a real sense of wildness, a fascinating combination of sea and sky, and the friendliest folks we’ve ever come across. For the adventure-minded cyclist, it doesn’t get any better than Newfoundland.

For those interested in the details of our trip we’ve provided information on routes, gear, logistics, etc. at the bottom of the page.

1

Here is a map of our travels.

 Before embarking on the T’railway, we loosen up our legs with some rocky doubletrack near Gros Morne.  Western Newfoundland has an impressive network of single and doubletrack, and no shortage of amazing views to match.


Before embarking on the T’railway, we loosen up our legs with some rocky doubletrack near Gros Morne. Western Newfoundland has an impressive network of single and doubletrack, and no shortage of amazing views to match.

Deer Lake to Huxley – Our first of many encounters with quads and quadrupeds.  Sections of deep, golf ball sized gravel made the first 30k a bit of a slog but we rode, and pushed on, hoping conditions would improve.

Deer Lake to Howley – Our first of many encounters with quads and quadrupeds. Sections of deep, golf ball sized gravel made the first 30k a bit of a slog but we rode, and pushed on, hoping conditions would improve.

Howley to Gaff Topsails – With railbed grades that rarely exceed 3% we forgot that we’d been climbing almost nonstop from Howley. However, diminishing tree height and increasing rain/fog/drizzle remind us that we’re gaining elevation.

Gaff Topsails – At 1554 feet up the weather lifts just long enough for us to get a glimpse of the famed Gaff Topsails.  Trail conditions surrounding the Gaff Topsails were generally rockier, and more technical, than any other section of our trip.

Gaff Topsails – At 1554 feet up the weather lifts just long enough for us to get a glimpse of the famed Gaff Topsails. Trail conditions surrounding the Gaff Topsails were generally rockier, and more technical, than any other section of our trip.

Gaff Topsails to Grand Falls-Windsor – Drying out after the wet and wild Gaff Topsails.

Gaff Topsails to Grand Falls-Windsor – Drying out after the wet and wild Gaff Topsails.

Gaff Topsails to Grand Falls-Windsor – The T’railway made clear the weak points in our bike kits.  A snapped front rack (shown), a demolished pedal, an abraded pannier, and a cracked water bottle cage forced us to spend a day repairing and rethinking our setup.

Gaff Topsails to Grand Falls-Windsor – The T’railway made clear the weak points in our bike kits. A snapped front rack (shown), a demolished pedal, an abraded pannier, and a cracked water bottle cage forced us to spend a day repairing and rethinking our setup.

Grand Falls-Windsor to Twillingate – Having rode the T’railway as far as Notre Dame Junction we decided to head north in search of icebergs.  The paved stretch from Notre Dame Junction to Twillingate was buttery and fast compared to the gravelly railbed, although the throngs of retirees wielding house-sized RV’s were a bit unnerving.

Grand Falls-Windsor to Twillingate – Having rode the T’railway as far as Notre Dame Junction we decided to head north in search of icebergs. The paved stretch from Notre Dame Junction to Twillingate was buttery and fast compared to the gravelly railbed, although the throngs of retirees wielding house-sized RV’s were a bit unnerving.

Twillingate – This iceberg was grounded just offshore . . . in waters 150 meters deep.

Twillingate – This iceberg was grounded just offshore . . . in waters 150 meters deep.

Twillingate – Just north of Twillingate, on the road to the lighthouse, we found one of our favorite campsites.  An abandoned park named Sleepy Cove provided us with a full evening’s worth of entertainment: icebergs, a group of humpback whales, and spawning capelin.

Twillingate – Just north of Twillingate, on the road to the lighthouse, we found one of our favorite campsites. An abandoned park named Sleepy Cove provided us with a full evening’s worth of entertainment: icebergs, a group of humpback whales, and spawning capelin.

Twillingate to Gambo – On a whim, we decided to ride highway 330/320 which hugs the coast from Gander Bay to Gambo.  Although paved, this was one of our favorite rides of the trip.  The ocean was always in view, traffic was light, and we got invited to a birthday party (!!!).  Unfortunately our camera battery died shortly after and we discovered that we left the charger back in Deer Lake.

Twillingate to Gambo – On a whim, we decided to ride highway 330/320 which hugs the coast from Gander Bay to Gambo. Although paved, this was one of our favorite rides of the trip. The ocean was always in view, traffic was light, and we got invited to a birthday party (!!!). Unfortunately our camera battery died shortly after and we discovered that we left the charger back in Deer Lake.

Gambo to Goobies – Thankfully we were able to borrow a charger in Glovertown.  Back on the T’railway, we wound our way though the boreal forests just west of Terre Nova Provincial Park.

Gambo to Goobies – Thankfully we were able to borrow a charger in Glovertown. Back on the T’railway, we wound our way though the boreal forests just west of Terre Nova Provincial Park.

Gambo to Goobies – Though quiet and car-free, the T’railway offers little in the way of protection from the sun.  With temperatures regularly climbing into the 30s we often had to find some midday relief.

Gambo to Goobies – Though quiet and car-free, the T’railway offers little in the way of protection from the sun. With temperatures regularly climbing into the 30s we often had to find some midday relief.

Gambo to Goobies – Luckily there are thousands of rivers and lakes to wash away the heat and dust at the end of the day.

Gambo to Goobies – Luckily there are thousands of rivers and lakes to wash away the heat and dust at the end of the day.

Goobies to Fortune – At Goobies the T’railway continues east to St. John’s.  Given our timing and penchant for lingering we thought it best to leave the Avalon Peninsula for another trip.  With a cold and damp handshake, the fog welcomed us to the Burin Peninsula.

Goobies to Fortune – At Goobies the T’railway continues east to St. John’s. Given our timing and penchant for lingering we thought it best to leave the Avalon Peninsula for another trip. With a cold and damp handshake, the fog welcomed us to the Burin Peninsula.

Goobies to Fortune – At times Newfoundland is impossibly charming

Goobies to Fortune – At times Newfoundland is impossibly charming

Goobies to Fortune – The road down the Burin had relatively light traffic after 10am and a reliable southerly headwind.  If we could have seen through the fog, we’re convinced that the view would have been spectacular.  By the time we got to the bottom of the Burin Peninsula, the fog had lifted and the Atlantic, once again, came into view.

Goobies to Fortune – The road down the Burin had relatively light traffic after 10am and a reliable southerly headwind. If we could have seen through the fog, we’re convinced that the view would have been spectacular. By the time we got to the bottom of the Burin Peninsula, the fog had lifted and the Atlantic, once again, came into view.

Fortune to St. Pierre et Miquelon – From the southern tip of Newfoundland it’s only a hour and a half ferry ride to the French colony of St. Pierre et Miquelon.  We intended to say a couple of days.  Instead we stayed a week and even then were reluctant to leave.

Fortune to St. Pierre et Miquelon – From the southern tip of Newfoundland it’s only a hour and a half ferry ride to the French colony of St. Pierre et Miquelon. We intended to stay a couple of days. Instead we stayed a week and even then were reluctant to leave.

Miquelon – Though St. Pierre’s bakeries and cobbled streets were lovely, we were drawn to the wilder islands of Miquelon and Langlade.

Miquelon – Though St. Pierre’s bakeries and cobbled streets were lovely, we were drawn to the wilder islands of Miquelon and Langlade.

Miquelon – This remote island, two ferry rides away from the far southern coast of Newfoundland, had everything a cyclist could want.  Sweet (and a little salty) oceanside strawberries!

Miquelon – This remote island, two ferry rides away from the far southern coast of Newfoundland, had everything a cyclist could want. Sweet (and a little salty) oceanside strawberries!

Miquelon – A herd of wild horses!

Miquelon – A herd of wild horses!

Miquelon – And grassy singletrack!

Miquelon – And grassy singletrack!

St. Pierre et Miquelon to Bay L’argent – After taking the ferry back to Fortune from St. Pierre we began retracing our steps back up the Burin Peninsula.  Same road, same fog.

St. Pierre et Miquelon to Bay L’argent – After taking the ferry back to Fortune from St. Pierre we began retracing our steps back up the Burin Peninsula. Same road, same fog.

Bay L’argent to Burgeo – The outpost communities along Newfoundland’s southern coast are accessible only by passenger ferry.  Because cars are not allowed on the ferries, most travels we met were limited to an out-and-back.  With bikes, however, we were able to cross the southern coast from east to west and complete a rather elegant loop of Newfoundland.

Bay L’argent to Burgeo – The outpost communities along Newfoundland’s southern coast are accessible only by passenger ferry. Because cars are not allowed on the ferries, most travelers we met were limited to an out-and-back. With bikes, however, we were able to cross the southern coast from east to west and complete a rather elegant loop of Newfoundland.

Bay L’argent to Burgeo – Outpost communities, like McCallum, harken back to a time when fishing dominated the culture and economy.  Today the story is much different.  Declining poplulations, lack of employment opportunities and incentives to relocate are threatening the longevity of these coastal communities.

Bay L’argent to Burgeo – Outpost communities, like McCallum, harken back to a time when fishing dominated the culture and economy. Today the story is much different. Declining poplulations, lack of employment opportunities and incentives to relocate are threatening the longevity of these coastal communities.

Bay L’argent to Burgeo – After a morning’s ferry ride we had a chance to stretch our legs riding from Poole’s cove to St. Jacques.  With the McCallum-Francois ferry running just once a week, we took a few extra days to explore the towns (and hills) northwest of Fortune Bay.

Bay L’argent to Burgeo – After a morning’s ferry ride we had a chance to stretch our legs riding from Poole’s cove to St. Jacques. With the McCallum-Francois ferry running just once a week, we took a few extra days to explore the towns (and hills) northwest of Fortune Bay.

Bay L’argent to Burgeo – While biding out time between ferries, we spent the weekend at the South Coast Music Festival in St. Jacques.  We were two happy campers having found ourselves with an abundance of traditional Newfoundland music, fish cakes and wild berries.

Bay L’argent to Burgeo – While biding out time between ferries, we spent the weekend at the South Coast Music Festival in St. Jacques. We were two happy campers having found ourselves with an abundance of traditional Newfoundland music, fish cakes and wild berries.

Bay L’argent to Burgeo – The southern coast has a number of remote communities, each one worth exploring.  However, after a week of sailing on, or waiting for a ferry we were antsy to get back on our bikes.  Wolf River, pictured above, will have to wait for another trip.

Bay L’argent to Burgeo – The southern coast has a number of remote communities, each one worth exploring. However, after a week of sailing on, or waiting for a ferry we were antsy to get back on our bikes. Francois, pictured above, will have to wait for another trip.

Burgeo to Deer Lake – From the map, the Burgeo highway didn’t seem terribly inspiring.  However, this stretch of road was unexpectedly awesome.  Very few cars and a ripping tailwind made for a whooping and hollering kind of ride.

Burgeo to Deer Lake – From the map, the Burgeo highway didn’t seem terribly inspiring. However, this stretch of road was unexpectedly awesome. Very few cars and a ripping tailwind made for a whooping and hollering kind of ride.

Burgeo to Deer Lake – Views like this made us feel like we were passing by an unexplored landscape.  No roads, no trails – the Annieopsquotch Mountains are an adventure waiting to happen.

Burgeo to Deer Lake – Views like this made us feel like we were passing by an unexplored landscape. No roads, no trails – the Annieopsquotch Mountains are an adventure waiting to happen.

Burgeo to Deer Lake – With rumors of an impending 3-day storm, we made quick work of the last stretch of the T’railway.  When the gravel got deep we dreamed of coming back to Newfoundland with fatbikes. . .

Burgeo to Deer Lake – With rumors of an impending 3-day storm, we made quick work of the last stretch of the T’railway. When the gravel got deep we dreamed of coming back to Newfoundland with fatbikes. . .

Burgeo to Deer Lake – On our last night a cold wind began to blow, a reminder that summer, and our bike tour, was coming to an end.  The following day we pedaled the last 80k back to Deer Lake and soon after we were on the ferry, watching Newfoundland disappear beneath the horizon.

Burgeo to Deer Lake – On our last night a cold wind began to blow, a reminder that summer, and our bike tour, was coming to an end. The following day we pedaled the last 80k back to Deer Lake and soon after we were on the ferry, watching Newfoundland disappear beneath the horizon.

The Bikes

33

Jen’s Surly Disc Trucker.

34

Daniel’s Surly Troll.

Daniel’s bike

Surly Troll
Revelate frame bags with a rear rack and small Jandd Mountain Pack Panniers

Jen’s bike
Surly Disc Trucker
Arkel rear panniers with a Revelate Tangle frame bag and Velo Orange front rack and bag

Both bike configurations worked well. The Revelate frame bags felt solid on the bumpy stuff, while the Arkel panniers offer almost bottomless amounts of waterproof storage. Our only complaint is the lack of waterproofing on some of the Revelate bags and the Jandd rear panniers. Days of rain, drizzle, fog kept our non-waterproof bags in a state of perpetual saturation. Non-waterproof bags work fine in a drier climate but in Newfoundland, waterproof gear is essential.
Jen ran 2.0 knobby tires while Daniel ran 2.2 knobbies. Tires with high volume but low rolling resistance worked well for our mixture of paved, dirt and gravel roads. The loose gravel sections of the T’railway were the most challenging and got us thinking of the benefits of fatbike touring. Though there is no perfect bike for this type of our, a rigid mountain bike with bikepacking bags or tight-fitting panniers would work well for most sections. As Malcolm has shown, a fatbike takes the edge off of the more gravelly sections, while less voluminous tires would make for speedier road riding.

Logistics

The ferries along the south coast have an irregular schedule so it’s best to call ahead to determine when each ferry runs. We found that the easiest way to do this was to call the ferry office (1-888-638-5454). Outside of the Avalon Peninsula the only bike shop we came across was in Corner Brook. We brought a beefy repair kit and were happy to have extra parts when the T’railway rattled our bikes. Extra spokes, tire boot, spare brake pads, an assortment of nuts and bolts, pipe clamps and dry chain lubricant proved to be very useful, in addition to the standard repair kit.

Route(s)

Our ride took us in a clockwise circle and the only backtracking we had to do was a couple of days on the Burin Peninsula. We came across a few other bike tourists (maybe 10 other people) but everyone else was riding across the island and returning by bus or ferry. In addition to our loop, we discovered another possible variation on this loop. A dirt road runs from Howley to Buchans and then from Buchans to the Burgeo highway. This would allow for an abbreviated loop or an alternative to returning west from the south coast.