marystown to garnish to point rosie

Run, don’t walk Drive, don’t run, to Garnish as soon as you can to ride the 24 km (one way) trail to Point Rosie.  This gem of a trail should be ridden by every person with a mountain bike in this province and every person who comes to this province for a visit.

GoogleEarth_Image

Darren and I began our trip from Marystown, following a dirt road that begins behind the swimming pool.  This dirt road leads to Garnish Pond and from there the Garnish Pond Trail begins.

This is the ONLY piece of signage we found riding from Marystown to Garnish.  Using a GoogleEarth while we were on the trail was invaluable for finding our way.

This is the ONLY piece of signage we found riding from Marystown to Garnish. Using Google Earth while we were on the trail was invaluable for finding our way.

The first 12 km from Marystown was gravel road but once on the Garnish Pond Trail it became a true ATV trail, with sections of bog that required us to dismount.

The first 12 km from Marystown was gravel road but once on the Garnish Pond Trail it became a true ATV trail, with sections of bog that required us to dismount.

Underneath that mess is a well used Larry tire.

Underneath that mess is a well used Larry tire.

A typical view on the trail as you ride toward Garnish.

A typical view from the trail as you ride toward Garnish.

BonaBurin2014 130

The trail from Garnish to Point Rosie starts at this bridge which is also a local swimming hole, complete with a change room and some benches.

The trail from Garnish to Point Rosie starts at this bridge which is also a local swimming hole, complete with a change room and some benches.

Crossing the Garnish River bridge. (Darren McD photo)

Crossing the Garnish River bridge. (Darren McD photo)

About 1 km into the trail, looking back at Garnish.

About 1 km into the trail, looking back at Garnish.

An old winch.  (Darren McD photo)

An old winch. (Darren McD photo)

About 3 km past the bridge the trail crosses a 2 km long beach.  We were able to ride the beach with our fatbikes but I think regular mountain bikes might have to walk this section.

About 3 km past the bridge the trail crosses a 2 km long beach. We were able to ride the beach with our fatbikes but I think regular mountain bikes might have to walk this section.

(Darren McD photo)

(Darren McD photo)

Looking back on the same beach.

Looking back on the same beach.

We made camp on a brackish pond behind the beach and thankfully were able to locate a spring for some fresh water.

We made camp on a brackish pond behind the beach and thankfully were able to locate a spring for some fresh water.

Had we known then what we know now, we would have ridden for a few more kms and made camp here...

Had we known then what we know now, we would have ridden for a few more kms and made camp here…

... as there was a lovely shelter and a pit toilet.  There we three of these rest stops along the trail.

… as there was a lovely shelter and a pit toilet. There were three of these rest stops along the trail.

We awoke the next day to rain and drizzle but luck was on our side as that all burned off and the sun came out shortly after beginning to ride.

We awoke the next day to rain and drizzle but luck was on our side as that all burned off and the sun came out shortly after beginning to ride. (Darren McD photo)

Sunshine = happy riders.

Sunshine = happy riders. (Darren McD photo)

Lots to look at when you're following 24 km of coast.

Lots to look at when you’re following 24 km of coast. (Darren McD photo)

DCIM100GOPRO

A garden belonging to a cabin owner.

DCIM100GOPRO

BonaBurin2014 184

IMGP0354

(Darren McD photo)

That's Point Rosie in the background.

That’s Point Rosie in the background.

On the beach in Point Rosie.  The community was resettled in the 1960's.

On the beach in Point Rosie. The community was resettled in the 1960’s.

DCIM100GOPRODCIM100GOPRO

Examining the graveyard.

Examining the graveyard.

IMGP0376

(Darren McD photo)

IMGP0374

(Darren McD photo)

DCIM100GOPRO

I'm sitting on what we believed to be were the steps to the chuch.  We later learned the church was floated to nearby Frenchman's Cove following the resettlement of Point Rosie.

I’m sitting on what we believed to be were the steps to the church. We later learned the church was floated to nearby Frenchman’s Cove following the resettlement of Point Rosie. (Darren McD photo)

IMGP0407

(Darren McD photo)

IMGP0373

(Darren McD photo)

Partridgeberries.

Partridgeberries.

Across the water we could see the south coast and English Harbour West. (Darren McD photo)

Across the water we could see the south coast and English Harbour West. (Darren McD photo)

We picked up our tents and other gear and made camp a little closer to Garnish on our second night. (Darren McD photo)

We picked up our tents and other gear and made camp a little closer to Garnish on our second night. (Darren McD photo)

We enjoyed a great sunset that night.  (Darren McD photo)

We enjoyed a great sunset that night. (Darren McD photo)

When we got back to Marystown I was thrilled to find this note on the car:

The note was from Daniel and Jen, cyclists from Vermont who I had been in email contact with.  They spent 2 months cycling around the province.

The note was from Daniel and Jen, cyclists from Vermont who I had been in email contact with. They spent 2 months cycling around the province.

Good things to know:

* Garnish to Point Rosie and back (50 km) took us 6 hours at an easy pace.

* Marystown to Garnish (appx 25 km) took about 3.5 hours.

* Our total trip was about 100 km and we did it over 48 hours (two nights camping out).

* I’m glad I rode from Marystown to Garnish but I wouldn’t seek it out again.  I strongly suggest starting at Garnish.

* There is lots of fresh water on the way to Point Rosie and, as mentioned above, 3 rest stops.

* I would also happily backpack this trail.

* I would LOVE to ride this trail in the winter.

Advertisements

17 thoughts on “marystown to garnish to point rosie

  1. Great job on all the trail info….soon hope to ride these trails. Skipper Bill sends from Ocean Quest Adventures

  2. This is a super trail. Judie and I did it numerous time when we were into ATVing. I even planned to propose to her at Point Rosie but a hurricane modified those plans . . .we were riding along the very top of the beach in DMac’s picture and the waves were making the ATV float. The Arm of God bridge always gave me the willies too. I would have to agree that a winter run would be fun.

  3. (Just for your info )The cement step you were sitting on we’re the steps to the school and not the church.
    The picture of the lone grave(close up ) is the resting place of my sister,(is weatherbeaten and in need of repair ) will be repairing it in the summer.
    This is the community where I lived until I was 12 years old
    Your postings brings back so many memories. I go back there often on atv.
    When I was training for a marathon in 2003 I ran the trail from garnish to point Rosie, those sandy and gravel beaches were gruelling for my training.
    So nice to see people taking an interest in our little community .
    Thanks for helping put Point Rosie on the net ……CHEERS..happy biking to you
    Les Holley (former resident of point Rosie now living in nearby Marystown )

    • Thank you for that, Les. Can you describe to me where the church was located?

      I can just imagine how gruelling running those beaches (and some of those hills) was. Very impressive. And what beautiful training grounds.

      • Hi
        I to lived in this village until I was 14. I’m glad you enjoyed your time there and hope you get to ride the trail again.
        As Les said you are siting is where the school use to be. The church was located in the top right hand corner where the high green brush is. And yes the church is still in operation in Frenchmans cove.
        Thanks for your post….love it!

  4. This is awesome! My mom (Sarah May) was born in Point Rosie in 1923 and grew up there. She had left home by the time her family relocated to Garnish. She met my dad in St. John’s around the end of WWII and they got married and moved to Saskatchewan. Not exactly sure of the timeline. Anyway…I’ve never been to Point Rosie but these pictures sure make me want to go!

  5. That naritive was terrific as we’re the photographs. I have long traveled in the footsteps of others and find the information invaluable in forming plans. Now that Point Rosie has real potential as a second Norse settlement in the new world your travels are all the more significant.
    Craig Burnham
    Salem MA

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s